https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ulhVR0CG02s
Life Hacks

Man Uses Piece Of Rope To Remove Snow From Roof

January 3rd, 2019

Winter months often bring fluffy layers of snow.

Sure, some of us are lucky enough to live in warmer climates, but most of us have to deal with frigid temperatures during these months.

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Mike Criss, Alaska Railroad Corporation/National Geographic Source: Mike Criss, Alaska Railroad Corporation/National Geographic

While most of us think of snow as simply a cold annoyance, it’s not as harmless as it may seem.

In fact, big amounts of snow can actually cause damage to your home!

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Carolyn Maier/Montana Standard Source: Carolyn Maier/Montana Standard

Some structures are more vulnerable than others. Older buildings have a greater risk of corrosion which can weaken their structural integrity. Homes with light-weight metal roofs or flat roofs are also more prone to cave in under pressure.

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Himalaya Group Inc. Source: Himalaya Group Inc.

To show how snow can damage a roof, USA Today cites the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), explaining:

“Fluffy fresh snow can weigh as little as three pounds per square foot compared with 21 pounds for wet, heavy snow. Ice weighs more: 57 pounds a square foot.”

“Considering the average-size roof in the United States is in the range of 2,000 square feet, the weight of snow and ice can add up to dangerous sums.”

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Journal & Topics Source: Journal & Topics

However, FEMA also notes: “More often than not, attempting to remove snow from a roof is more hazardous than beneficial, posing a risk to both [people] and the roofing.”

So, what’s a homeowner to do?

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YouTube Source: YouTube

This man has come up with a brilliant solution.

Using a hammer, a ladder, and rope, this homeowner has devised an effortless way to clear your roof of snow. First, you should tie your hammer on to one end of the rope, creating a makeshift weight. Once you’re on the roof, toss the hammer on to the ground (but don’t forget to hold on to the other side of the rope!)

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YouTube Source: YouTube

Once you’ve dropped the hammer, wrap the rope around the edge of the piled snow.

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YouTube Source: YouTube

Now, disembark from the roof, with the unweighted side of the rope still in your hand. At this point, you have effectively lassoed the snow.

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YouTube Source: YouTube

Now, it’s time for the fun.

Grabbing both ends of the rope, all you need to do is pull. At this point, your lasso will cut through a layer of snow, allowing it to slide right off.

This will, of course, mean bigger piles of snow around the house— but it’s still a heck of a lot better than fixing a collapsed rooftop!

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YouTube Source: YouTube

Since being uploaded, this man’s clever method has been viewed more than 100,000 times.

It’s so simple and effortless, you have to wonder why nobody came up with the idea sooner. Comments on the video read:

“Great!”

“This is the safe way to do it, but if you place several ropes on the peak of the roof before snow season, you only need to pull one rope after each storm.”

“Fantastic idea. Thanks for sharing this. I can make use of this technique in Canada.”

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YouTube Source: YouTube

Watch the video below!

Please SHARE this with your friends and family.

Source: Big World

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